Sunday, April 30, 2006

Podcast #23 - Graphic History, The Murder of Abraham Lincoln by Rick Geary

Hello. I continue with my recent interest in using graphic history as part of the curriculum. I recently saw a listing in the Library School Journal magazine about graphic novels and one caught my I so I found a copy of The Murder of Abraham Lincoln by Rick Geary. It is a great book done in the graphic format. Geary has done an amazing job with pen and pencil in telling the story of the one of the most tragic days in American history. The book includes maps, a great bibliography and some great thought provoking questions at the end. I conducted a phone interview with Mr. Geary and asked him about his unique look at the assassination of Lincoln. Geary is an accomplished illustrator who has been working in comics since 1977. His work has been appeared in The National Lampoon, DC Comics, Mad, Spy, Rolling Stone and the Los Angeles Times. It was also great to discover that he was born in Kansas City. He also has done a graphic history book named "The Fatal Bullet: The Assassination of President James A Garfield". Check out the links below to learn more about Mr. Geary and his work.

Please let me know what you think of today's show by leaving me an e-mail or comment at
speakingofhistory@gmail.com I am also very interested if any history teachers out there have used graphic novels or graphic books in their classroom.

Direct link to Speaking of History Podcast #23: Graphic History, The Murder of Abraham Lincoln by Rick Geary

Show Notes for Podcast #23:

4 comments:

  1. I think using comic books and graphic novels are an excellent tool to use when teaching history. A majority of students today read anime or read other types of graphic novels by mainstays like Marvel and DC comics. Doing this touches on student prior knowledge about this medium and may quirk their interest in historical graphic novels or comic books. Excellent job Mr.Langhorst!

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  2. Thanks for this posting as well. I'm both a Lincoln enthusiast and a comic book collector, so this book would be doubly appealing for me.


    Geoff Elliott

    The Abraham Lincoln Blog

    http://abrahamlincolnblog.blogspot.com

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